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We’re all on some sort of journey, aren’t we? Check back here periodically to find out more about G. Elizabeth Kretchmer’s journeys through the literary world and through life.

Bear Medicine: About Domestic Violence and So Much More

I released Bear Medicine this month to coincide with domestic violence awareness month.

But the novel isn’t only about abuse against women; it’s also about women learning to survive without men and, in so doing, seeking out their own paths.

 

The original concept for the novel first came to me when our family visited the Yellowstone area in 2004. It’s a gorgeous region, but also an unforgiving one: scalding geysers that can swallow you in an instant, thousands of square miles of lonely backcountry, harsh weather, overactive seismic activity, and feisty iconic beasts–most notably bison and grizzly bear.

The story changed dramatically over the past decade or so, unfolding layer after layer. Writing a book is a bit like playing charades; you get little clues of what you want to say, and you keep guessing as you go. At least that’s how it works for me. Scenes appeared in my mind in random order. Characters came and went. Themes bubbled noisily like Yellowstone mud pots, erupted, and then quieted. It took several drafts before I really knew what the novel was going to be about, or what I wanted to say.

Yes, it’s about abuse against women. By necessity, it’s also about search for self, which is universal for everyone but often especially troubling for women under duress. It’s about the Indian Wars of the 1800s and native lore, then and now. It’s about mothers and daughters and leaving legacies. It’s about loving kindness, although those words aren’t used anywhere in the pages.

And it’s about sacred friendships forming in a sacred landscape.

I hope you’ll accept my invitation to journey along with Brooke, Anne, Maggie and Leila in Bear Medicine. Now available through your favorite indie bookstore or online at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and iTunes.

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8 Enlightening Works About American Indian History

140 years ago today, hundreds of American Indian refugees were on the run. The Nez Perce had been known as a peaceful and cooperative nation, having helped Lewis and Clark among other white men, but after the US government reneged on treaty promises, some of the Nez Perce refused to be rounded up and hauled off… Continue Reading

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Christine Z. Mason: 8 Enchanting Kids Books Ages 8 Thru 12

Several years ago, I met Christine through on online writers’ critique group. We became friends as writers, but also as moms. Our respective children have grown up, but we occasionally recall and share our child-rearing experiences of the past. One of the best parts of raising kids, we agree, is that it brings another realm… Continue Reading

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One Response to Christine Z. Mason: 8 Enchanting Kids Books Ages 8 Thru 12

  1. I’m very honored to be included in this list of wonderful children’s books. Thank you, Christine and Elizabeth! And I highly recommend Christine’s book, The Mystery of the Ancient Stone City!

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K.S.R. Burns: 8 Great Reads Set in Paris

  I became acquainted with author K.S.R. (Karen) Burns several years ago when I moved to the Seattle area and was looking for a new writing critique group. Although we never wound up working together on our writing projects, our paths have continued to cross. Her latest novel is set in Paris, where she lived for… Continue Reading

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  1. Thanks for this list. I loved Paris Letters and also have a copy of A Paris Year ready to read. Also really enjoyed The Paris Wife and recommend readers to start with it followed by Moveable Feast to get another perspective.

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What’s Your Personal Credo?

  “I believe in living on grateful terms with the earth.” ~Maxine Kumin Mahatma Ghandi said that our beliefs influence the people we become. William James said that what we believe helps create a life worth living. And Soren Kierkegaard said that belief is what holds the world together. When I was a student in Pacific… Continue Reading

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